21st c. luthiers from Mainland USA click for more

In being on the look out for nice Ukuleles I see the work of a number of full and part time luthiers. The instruments they make look very nice and worthy of note.

Carlos Prentiss - Atlas Stringed Instruments

Based in Capitola, California he is a fine woodworker and finish carpenter specializing in custom furniture design and commercial and residential remodels. He learned woodworking at the Pacific Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding and has go on from there to make a number of things including Ukuleles under the brandin Atlas Stringed Instruments, (not to be confused with Gremlins range of world instruments also branded Atlas; though this range doesn't include Ukuleles). So far I have seen Sopranos and Concerts from him

Larry Hinkle

Based in Fredericksburg, Virginia he studied Fine Cabinetmaking at College of the Redwoods and says he has been professional woodworker for over twenty years. He started making Ukuleles before 2013 and was using the branding Kalea for a while though he has stopped now. He has made over 100 Ukuleles, mainly Concert scale but also some Sopranos and the occasional Tenor and Baritone. He also makes some resonator models and Uke Basses, but I've not seen any extra string variants of Pineapples. He uses a lot of local and reclaimed woods, even starting the milling process from local windfalls personally but I have seen more exotic woods used and some decorated models too His headstock logos, (if he uses one), are very hand made as are his sound hole levels and on the subject of headstocks he use to have 4 in a row headstock but now does 2 pairs.

Peter Malinoski

Based in Maryland, with a masters degree in woodworking and functional design and in business since the mid 1990's he is predominantly and electric Guitar maker and doesn't really make Ukuleles. However in his stock catalogue there is an electric Mandolin he calls the "Mando Moon" that comes as an 8, 5, or 4 string version. The 4 string version with its 13-7/8" scale (353mm) and its 1½" (38mm) nut width, wide for a Mandolin but exactly the same size as a Concert Ukulele, is pretty much ideal to retune and convert into a Concert scale electric Ukulele.

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